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The Complete Node.js Developer Course (3rd Edition)

Your essay will be the representation of an argument on a given subject or subjects. It will include only points which are relevant to the subject, so be careful to get rid of material that is not directly relevant. Although students sometimes complain that the lengths demanded of essays are too long, most of the essays you will write are really relatively short. Part of the skill of writing is to write concisely and economically, without wasting material or 'padding' the work with irrelevant diversions and repetition. Once the points have been chosen they should be presented logically and coherently, so do not leap about from point to point. Each point generally will have some connection to the preceding one and the one which follows. If you do leave one part of the essay to move onto another, but intend later to go back to the point you have left and show, for example, how the points may be connected or related, then it can be useful to say so by 'signposting', e.g. 'this point will be picked up later', 'this point will be returned to later, after taking into consideration ...'. After each draft of the essay check that each point is presented in a logical and coherent order. Read each draft carefully and critically. Is there a significant idea you have not included in the essay? Do you need to expand some of the points you have chosen to write about? Are some of the points, after due consideration, not really relevant? Have you been too long-winded or repetitive? If so, cut out and/or reduce some of the text. Does your argument need to be clearer, and do the links between some of the main points need more emphasis? You should be asking yourself these questions throughout the whole process. Strong sentences are essential in terms of the flow of your essay. When signalling the fact that they now want to begin a discussion about the imagery of the text in question, students often begin paragraphs with a sentence such as the following: 'I will now go on to discuss the imagery, which plays an important role in this story.' Whilst this would be fine in a first draft for more refined essay writing there are much better alternatives and methods. What is wrong with this particular sentence? To start with there is no real need to introduce the subject so mechanically: as you are writing about literature it will come as no great surprise to the reader that imagery is to be discussed at some point. Secondly, as the student has chosen to write about the imagery there is no need to state that it is important. If it was not important then the student should not have chosen to write about it. (Please note that there would be no objection to a sentence such as 'I will now go on to discuss the imagery, which is fundamental to a full understanding of the story', although it would be even better if the type of imagery was identified. This says something different. Do not repeat these phrases mechanically in your essays - the imagery will not always be absolutely key to understanding the story. Use your common sense.)

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September 27, 2021 • 20 Days • 10 lectures • 3 Sections

Description

Your essay will be the representation of an argument on a given subject or subjects. It will include only points which are relevant to the subject, so be careful to get rid of material that is not directly relevant. Although students sometimes complain that the lengths demanded of essays are too long, most of the essays you will write are really relatively short. Part of the skill of writing is to write concisely and economically, without wasting material or ‘padding’ the work with irrelevant diversions and repetition. Once the points have been chosen they should be presented logically and coherently, so do not leap about from point to point. Each point generally will have some connection to the preceding one and the one which follows. If you do leave one part of the essay to move onto another, but intend later to go back to the point you have left and show, for example, how the points may be connected or related, then it can be useful to say so by ‘signposting’, e.g. ‘this point will be picked up later’, ‘this point will be returned to later, after taking into consideration …’. After each draft of the essay check that each point is presented in a logical and coherent order. Read each draft carefully and critically. Is there a significant idea you have not included in the essay? Do you need to expand some of the points you have chosen to write about? Are some of the points, after due consideration, not really relevant? Have you been too long-winded or repetitive? If so, cut out and/or reduce some of the text. Does your argument need to be clearer, and do the links between some of the main points need more emphasis? You should be asking yourself these questions throughout the whole process.

Strong sentences are essential in terms of the flow of your essay. When signalling the fact that they now want to begin a discussion about the imagery of the text in question, students often begin paragraphs with a sentence such as the following: ‘I will now go on to discuss the imagery, which plays an important role in this story.’ Whilst this would be fine in a first draft for more refined essay writing there are much better alternatives and methods. What is wrong with this particular sentence? To start with there is no real need to introduce the subject so mechanically: as you are writing about literature it will come as no great surprise to the reader that imagery is to be discussed at some point. Secondly, as the student has chosen to write about the imagery there is no need to state that it is important. If it was not important then the student should not have chosen to write about it. (Please note that there would be no objection to a sentence such as ‘I will now go on to discuss the imagery, which is fundamental to a full understanding of the story’, although it would be even better if the type of imagery was identified. This says something different. Do not repeat these phrases mechanically in your essays – the imagery will not always be absolutely key to understanding the story. Use your common sense.)

Course Instruction

Description

Have you tried to learn Node before? You start a new course, and the instructor has you installing a bunch of libraries before you even know what Node is or how it works. You eventually get stuck and reach out to the instructor, but you get no reply. You then close the course and never open it again. Sound familiar? I created this course to be what I wanted when I was learning Node. The Complete Node.js Developer Course covers the fundamentals of Node before diving deep into great tools like Express, Mongoose, and MongoDB. The entire course is based around a single goal: Turning you into a professional Node developer capable of developing, testing, and deploying real-world production applications. The best way to learn Node is by building Node apps. From the very start you’ll be programming every project and working through challenges that I’ve designed to reinforce what you’ve learned. This will give you the hands-on experience necessary to be able to create and launch your own project once you’re done. You’ll be building four projects: 1. A note-taking app to get your feet wet 2. A weather application that interacts with the MapBox and Dark Sky APIs 3. A task manager REST API complete with user accounts and authentication 4. A real-time chat app with a client-side companion By the end, you’ll be able to take what you’ve learned and launch your own Node application. When learning, learn the latest. I work to keep this course full of the most up-to-date Node material out there. This course is compatible with the latest Node.js version. You’re getting access to hot-off-the-press features. Everything you need comes in one easy-to-use package. You can stop worrying if you're learning the right skills to build an app or land a new job. I've curated all the tech that's essential to building real-world apps. I've mapped out everything in a comprehensive, easy-to-follow package designed to get you up and running in a few weeks. There’s no better time to learn Node. According to the 2016 Stack Overflow Survey, Node is in the top ten for back-end popularity and back-end salary, with an average salary of $85k. This means more jobs and more opportunities for you. You might get stuck. But I’m here to help. There’s nothing worse than getting five hours into a course, getting stuck, and not getting the help you need to continue. I’m in the Q&A everyday to help you get unstuck. I reply to every question to get you back on track. Don’t take my word for it. Check the reviews and see what other students are saying. “Any questions people seem to have are answered swiftly, clearly, and often with examples posted on GitHub. Even when the questions asked are out of the scope of the course Andrew seems to come up trumps." - Adam Tait "This is amazing. What's even better is the instructor answered all the questions I asked." - Pak Chu "The real value in this course is Andrew; he is not just a great teacher, but also he's quick to answer questions and provide feedback." - Nick Hester I guarantee this is the most up-to-date and engaging Node course available, and it comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. During eight chapters you'll learn: 1. Node.js 2. Npm 3. Asynchronous programming 4. ES6/ES7 5. MongoDB 6. Express 7. Socket.IO 8. JWT Authentication 9. Mongoose 10. File and image uploads 11. Email sending 12. Application deployment with Heroku 13. Version control with Git 14. GitHub 15. REST API Design 16. Code testing 17. Debugging 18. Jest 19. Many more tools I can’t wait to see you on the inside! - Andrew

Who this course is for:

  • Anyone looking to launch their own Node applications, switch careers, or freelance as a Node developer

Course Curriculum

Who is this course for?
Who is this course for? 00:00:00
Installing and Exploring Node.js 00:00:00
Node.js Module System (Notes App) 00:00:00
File System and Command Line Args (Notes App)
File System and Command Line Args (Notes App) 00:00:00
Asynchronous Node.js (Weather App) 00:00:00
Web Servers (Weather App) 00:00:00
Debugging Node.js (Notes Apps)
Debugging Node.js (Notes Apps) 00:00:00
Accessing API from Browser (Weather App) 00:00:00
Application Deployment (Weather App) 00:00:00
MongoDB and Promises (Task App) 00:00:00

Instructor

18  Student • 5  Courses

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Guy's a pro. Did you enjoy your meal, Mom? You drank it fast enough. Not tricks, Michael, illusions. Really? Did nothing cancel? I don't understand the question, and I won't respond to it.

I don't understand the question, and I won't respond to it. There's so many poorly chosen words in that sentence. I'm a monster. It's a hug, Michael. I'm hugging you. I care deeply for nature. I hear the jury's still out on science.

It's a hug, Michael. I'm hugging you. No, I did not kill Kitty. However, I am going to oblige and answer the nice officer's questions because I am an honest man with no secrets to hide. Oh, you're gonna be in a coma, all right.

What's Spanish for "I know you speak English?" Across from where? Marry me. What's Spanish for "I know you speak English?" Bad news. Andy Griffith turned us down. He didn't like his trailer. Steve Holt!

Now, when you do this without getting punched in the chest, you'll have mor

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